Wild Men on the North Fork

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Peppers - Squash | Tomato - Watermelon
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This page: 2016 Planting Guide, When to Start Seed, When to Set Out
Wyogrow...where the tough get growing, by Fred Jacquot
I have been an active gardener in the Casper area now for over 30 years. Back when I first started no one could tell a beginner what kind of carrots or tomatoes grew best here. Because I have been taking notes all these years, you can find out what plants do best in Wyoming on the 'vegetable varieties' pages, whose links are above.
Along with my partners Mark McAtee and Paul Combe I have done a lot of experimenting and research. You can find the results of this activity on these many pages. Please click on the links and start viewing our work. I think you will find that there is a huge amount of information available here for you. Enjoy!

Below are a few links to some nice garden sites.

Fermented Tomato Conserve (Conserva Cruda Di Pomodoro)
Why Do You Soak Cucumbers Before Pickling?
Texas A&M Vegetables
Here is a link to Garden Guides!
Rocky Mountain Garden Forum
Garden Humor
About Composting
AustinRealEstate.com

Regular Season 2019

August 19, 2019

Here is a productivity chart for my tomatoes this year.

2019 Tomato Productivity
Plants were rated 0 - 5
Variety Name Number of Plants Individual Plant
Scores
Average
Productivity
Score
Buffalo Steak 3 3.5 - 4.5 - 5.0 4.33
Bush Beefsteak 4 4.5 - 4.5 - 4.0 - 4.5 4.32
Goliath Prime 2 3.5 - 5.0 4.25
Goliath Giant 2 4.0 - 3.5 3.75
Sun Sugar 2 2.5 - 5.0 3.75
Big Mama 2 3.0 - 3.5 3.25
Tomande 2 3.0 - 3.5 3.25
Black Krim 3 3.5 - 2.5 - 3.5 3.16
Tonopah 2 3.0 - 3.0 3.0
Atlas 2 2.5 - 3.0 2.75
Applause 4 3.5 - 1.0 - 3.0 - 4.0 2.25

August 18, 2019

Here are some photos from my garden this year.

How Warm has it been?

Regular readers know that I keep a degree-day chart each year. I have chosen the base temperature of 50 degrees (F.) because I don't think plants do much growing below that temperature.

Degree days are the cumulative average temperatures above the set base (50 in this case). I always begin counting degree days on May 25, Casper's last average day of frost. If on May 25 the average temperature was 62 degrees, that would be 12 degrees above 50 and the cumulative total would be 12. If on May 26 the average temperature was 64 degrees, that is 14 degrees above 50 . I add that 14 to the 12 I already have, and the degree days for May 26 would be 26. Adding the degrees above the base together is what makes degree-days cumulative.

Here is the 2018 degree-day chart.

MAY 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 JUNE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
HIGH 38 40 44 62 66 75 57 47 61 67 71 72 79 78 76 79 82 84 60
LOW 29 29 28 37 37 31 44 40 37 35 40 42 42 47 48 47 42 51 33
AVER. 2019 33.5 34.5 35.5 49.5 51.5 52.5 50.5 43.5 49 51 55.5 57 60.5 62.5 62 63 62 67.5 46.5
DD (50) 1.5 4 4.5 -2.0 -3.0 -2.0 3.5 10.5 21 33.5 45.5 58.5 70.5 88 84.5
JUNE 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
HIGH 65 73 69 77 83 76 78 74 73 71 80 81 66 66 69 76 84
LOW 27 25 37 34 44 50 46 50 52 48 47 39 42 36 45 46 39
AVER. 2019 45 49 53 55.5 63.5 63 62 62 62.5 59.5 63.5 59.5 54 51 57 61 61.5
DD (50) 79.5 78.5 81.5 87 100.5 113.5 125.5 137.5 150 159.5 173 182.5 186.5 187.5 194.5 205.5 217
JUNE 26 27 28 29 30 JULY 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
HIGH 87 89 89 90 83 87 71 81 82 80 83 90 87 86 78 84
LOW 41 43 43 52 55 52 50 48 50 46 42 44 53 61 49 45
AVER. 2019 64 65.5 65.5 71 69 69.5 70.5 64.5 66 63 62.5 67 70 73.5 63.5 64.5
DD (50) 231 246.5 262 283 302 321.5 342 356.5 372.5 385.5 398 415 435 458.5 472 486.5
JULY 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
HIGH 95 92 96 92 93 93 95 97 84 83 90 94 96 93 93 87
LOW 54 52 56 56 49 55 54 53 56 50 55 54 57 57 54 60
AVER. 2019 74.5 72 76 74 71 74 74.5 75 70 66.5 72.5 74 76.5 75 73.5 73.5
DD (50) 511 533 559 583 604 628 652.5 677.5 697.5 714 736.5 760.5 787 812 835.5 859
JULY 28 29 30 31 AUG 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
HIGH 90 91 98 97 84 93 94 96 92 97 92 87 86 83
LOW 55 47 60 53 58 54 51 53 59 52 54 57 56 51
AVER. 2019 72.5 69 79 75 73 73.5 72.5 74.5 75.5 74.5 73 73.5 73 71.5
DD (50) 881.5 900.5 929.5 954.5 977.5 1001 1023.5 1048 1073.5 1098 1121 1144.5 1167.5 1189
AUGUST 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
HIGH 87 86 83 90 87
LOW 54 45 47 49 52
AVER. 2019 70.5 65.5 65 69.5 69.5
DD (50) 1209.5 1225 1240 1259.5 1279

- - This year's Degree Days compared to past years - -

Degree Days Through June 30
Through July 15
Through July 31
Through August 15
Through August 31
Through Sept. 19
This
Period
Running
Total
This
Period
Running
Total
This
Period
Running
Total
This
Period
Running
Total
This
Period
Running
Total
This
Period
Season
Total
2019
302.5
302.5
280.5
583
371.5
954.5
324.5
1279
2018
505.5
505.5
351.5
857
314
1171
303
1474
251
1725
286.5
2011.5
2017
350.5
350.5
403.5
754
373
1127
234.5
1361.5
302.5
1664
252
1916
2016
523.5
523.5
272
795.5
387
1182.5
308
1490.5
209
1699.5
182.5
1882
2015
529
529
282.5
811.5
286
1097.5
311.5
1409
254.5
1663.5
279
1942.5
2014
390
390
299
689
380
1069
312.5
1381.5
243.5
1625
167
1792
2013
524.5
524.5
339
863.5
317
1180.5
426.5
1607
381.5
1988.5
315.5
2304
2012
558
558
362
920
416
1336
314.5
1650.5
317
1967.5
243
2210.5
2011
322.5
322.5
325.5
648
385.5
1033.5
305
1338.5
367
1705.5
195
1900.5
2010
364
364
228
592
264
856
394.5
1250.5
322
1572.5
175
1747.5
2009
327
327
258.5
585.5
256
841.5
267
1108.5
216
1324.5
254.5
1579
2008
292.5
292.5
281
573.5
387
960.5
289
1249.5
282.5
1532
96
1628
2007
431.5
431.5
348.5
780
400.5
1180.5
344.5
1525
278.5
1803.5
277.5
2081
2006
567.5
567.5
332.5
900
426.5
1326.5
308.5
1635
294.5
1929.5
131.5
2061
2005
333.5
333.5
297
630.5
360
990.5
256.5
1247
240
1487
242.5
1729.5
2004
314
314
270
584
269
853
275.5
1128.5
197.5
1326
246
1572
2003
401.5
401.5
307.5
709
399
1108
388
1496
317.5
1813.5
146.5
1960
2002
528
528
360
888
364
1252
278
1530
262
1792
248
2040

July 1, 2019

Our temperatures are warming up, finally. And that heat is benefitting us. We have been eating lettuce, broccoli, and peas for a while now. Tomatoes are laying on fruit. In bloom are beans, pepper, tomatoes and wife Judy's flowers from which she creates organic dyes. The carrots have been thinned well and will produce something for us to eat on the next and final thinning. Cucumbers, melons, and squash are laying out vines which we will trellise. So, even though this season has been cool so far, we got plenty of moisture which helped the gardens reach this developing phase.

July 1, 2019

This growing season, so far, is the second coolest season since I started tracking temperatures. This implications are that the cooler season crops in your garden will be doing better than the warm season crops. By cooler season crops I mean: Radish, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, and Lettuce. Warm season crops include: Corn, Squash, Cucumber.

June 24, 2019

I always look carefully at seasonal temperatures around May 25 because that is the average last day of frost. It was obvious then that our temperatures were still way to cold to plant warmer weather plants (I already had planted peas, lettuce, broccoli, and cabbage.)

So I waited to begin. I knew that my usually reliable indicator was stunted and slow this year.

My Spirea bush, and other spirea bushes nearby and ususally dependable planting indicators. But, instead they were holding back their blossoms. They did not bloom this year until June 6th, at the earliest. My own bush waited until June 9th. So I took some risk putting out Tomatoes and Peppers between June 3rd and June 5th. In Casper temperatures plunged again and the night temperatures were below 40 degrees farenheit from June 8 through June 12, slipping to to 27 degrees on June 9th and 25 degrees on June 10th.

My tomatoes are doing well, all things considered. Here is a productivity chart for them, as of today.

Tomato Productivity - June 24, 2019
Tomato Name and #
Number of Flowers
(1 point per blossom)
Points for Fruit
(2 points per tomato)
Total Points
.
Tomato Name and #
Number of Flowers
(1 point per blossom)
Points for Fruit
(2 points per tomato)
Total Points
Buffalo Steak 1-1
1
0
1
.
Tonopah 1-2
4
4
8
Applause 1-3
3
0
3
.
Sun Sugar 1-4
4
18
22
Black Krim 2-1
6
0
6
.
Atlas 2-2
3
0
3
Tomande 2-3
12
0
12
.
Applause 2-4
4
0
4
Bush Beefsteak 3-1
0
0
0
.
Goliath Prime 3-2
0
0
0
Black Krim 3-3
8
6
14
.
Goliath Giant 3-4
9
4
13
Bush Beefsteak 4-1
8
0
8
.
Applause 4-2
12
0
12
Big Mama 4-3
13
0
13
.
Tonopah 4-4
4
0
4
Sun Sugar 5-1
40
0
40
.
Black Krim 5-2
14
0
14
Bush Beefsteak 5-3
11
0
11
.
Tomande 5-4
24
0
24
Big Mama 6-1
9
4
13
.
Applause 6-2
20
2
22
Bush Beefsteak 6-3
4
0
4
.
Buffalo Steak 6-4
15
2
17
Goliath Prime 7-1
6
4
10
.
Buffalo Steak 7-2
18
0
18
Goliath Giant 7-3
11
0
11
.
Atlas 7-4
14
0
14

Here is a sorting for the average plant productivity score for all the varieties listed above.

Sun Sugar=24.5
Tomande=18.0
Black Krim=14.0
Big Mama=13
Buffalo Steak=12.0
Goliath Giant=12.0
Applause=10.25
Atlas=8.5
Tonopah=6.0
Bush Beefsteak=5.75
Goliath Prime=5.0

May 28, 2019

Snow on the Daffodils

Each Spring I do a count of how many times it has snowed on the Daffodils. Wyoming is lousy country for daffodils because of our late snows. This Spring it snowed upon the Daffodils at least six times as the photos above partially reveal.

Below is a photo of my Spirea Bush taken on May 21, 2019.

In a typical Spring I can use my Spirea, and others, as faithful predictors of when to set out Tomato plants. Not this Spring! Their growth and development has been stunted by the cold.

About the Average Last Day of Frost: This date, for Casper, Wyoming is May 25. Now that this milestone is past it should be safe to plant Tomato plants. I have 12 of the 28 plants I intend to set out out there in our rainy and cold environment. I also have planted Peas, Lettuce, and Carrots. I am still not setting out my Peppers, Beans, or Cucumbers. I like to plant the last two at the same time. But soil temperatures are just not warm enough yet.

Between Seasons 2018-19

February 10, 2019

3 Factors for Gardening Success

#3...Climate Control

Birds do it, bees do it, farmers do it in a big way.

WINDBREAKS

CONTOUR PLOWING

IRRIGATION
Farmers all over the world modify the climate in which they grow crops. Among the methods they use are windbreaks, countour plowing and irrigation. They know, as we should know, that climate modification is necessary.
The Wind Kills
We once had an 80 mph wind gust the day after we set out our tomatoes. That stripped all the leaves off all of the plants. That inspired us to begin using tubes to keep the wind off. All but one of the tomato plants put on new leaves and survived. We found that there are multiple advantages to using thick-walled plastic tubing. It keeps the wind off the tender young plant that is going through root shock. If pushed down into the ground, it prevents cut worms from attacking.
Tubes provide thermal mass, and radiate heat back to the plant during the evening. They allow just enough wind to strike the plant to allow it to wiggle. This makes the stem stronger. When the plant does grow up out of the tube it is ready to handle the wind.
We use tubes for Tomato, Pepper, Cucumber, and Bean. The tender sprouts of the last two attract a lot of attention from the beetles. Tubes provide a barrier to the bugs. In the case of Cucumber, we sometimes tie a netting over the tube. When the plant grows large enough to touch the netting, it is also strong enough to withstand beetle attack, and we remove the netting.
Fences and wind barriers of all kinds are used in Wyoming gardens, and you should seriously consider using some in your garden. There are currently on the market products, such as 'Wall of Water' that shield young tomato plants from wind and store energy from the sun and radiate that heat back to the plants in the day. Bill Simpson used to build a long temporary wall (24" to 30" of stacked concrete blocks. Then he would build short stub walls coming off the long wall at 90 degrees. The areas between the short walls was where he planted his tomato plants. His plants got to be huge. The concrete blocks radiated a lot of thermal energy back to his tomatoes at night.
Watering
We have found that tubes also help the watering process. When it is super hot outside, we like to water every other day. But tomatoes love water (they also love good drainage...go figure). When I water the Tomatoes and Peppers I simply fill the tubes full of water (when the plants are big and flowering). The water seeps slowly into the soil for a deep watering, which is what I want. But beware. Do not do this early in the season. I killed some tomato plants one season by watering deeply this way too early. I would not water this way unless the plant is at least twice as high as when I set it out, and the temperatures are very warm.

The time to plan how you are going to water your garden is before you plant. Where exactly will the hose end up when you drag it through your beds? Will you need to drive stakes for hose control?

Please click on the links below to take you to other climate-related pages.

Climate/Conditions

Raised Beds

February 8, 2019

I have placed all of my orders for seeds and plants for the 2019 gardening season. I have cut back the number of tomato plants I will put in. I will also be growing an experimental bed this year featuring the 3 Sisters (corn, beans, squash) that native americans used to plant.

January 21, 2019

3 Factors for Gardening Success

#2...Soils

Clay soils, in particular, will compact through the process of watering. So even if you never trod on tilled soil you can be compacting it every time you water. Always take the opportunity to mix some humus in as you till, and to mix it into the soil surrounding trees and bushes. Humus is available in the forms of peat moss, manure, and compost. Peat can be purchased by the bag, or by the bale. It comes to us mostly from Canada It is dug there from old lake beds, and contains the plant remains of hundreds, even thousands of years of lake-plant growth. Peat moss provides great humus that is slightly acidic. That acidity will neutralize some of the alkali in our (Wyoming) soils.

Manures have different degrees of 'hotness', or concentrations of nitrogen. Sheep manure is the hottest available to Casper residents. To obtain some you may have to drive out into the countryside to ranches that feed herds of sheep over the winter. Never use fresh sheep manure. Use only aged sheep manure, and use it sparingly. Even aged sheep manure can burn plants if it is too concentrated.

Horse manure is 'hotter' than cow manure, and has fewer active seeds. Use manure that has aged in a pile for a least a year, as that composting tends to kill a lot of seeds in the manure.

Tiny grains of clay in freshly tilled soil are widely separated. During compaction there is less and less space between them. Because they are very thin they orient horizontally during compaction, forming a barrier that is virtually impossible for roots to penetrate.
Sandy soil also presents problems. Think humus and manure...or organics. Sandy soil is severly lacking in organics. Till some in every year until you get a more acceptable soil mix.
Please click on this link to go to the Soils page.

December 4, 2018

3 Factors for Gardening Success

#1...Selection

Dear Kristine:

By now you happily situated in your new home in Minnesota, far away from Wyoming. I will, of course, miss you a lot.

But you will have more time and opportunity to do some gardening this coming season. This note is to help you get sorted. Now is the time of year to start thinking about what kind of, and how much gardening you will want to be doing come August. It is your call.

Of the three main factors in gardening success I believe that Selection is the most important (over climate and soil). This is simply because selecting the very best varieties for your location will make up for many deficiencies in climate and soil.

By now I have already received three seed catalogs and many more are yet to come. I will be reading all of them carefully because they contain a ton of information, both positive and negative. The seed (and plant) catalog business is an old one in the United States. The oldest company that I know about is Stark Brothers in SouthEast Missouri. It was founded by old General Stark from the Revolutionary War. It is still a family business and many consider Stark to be THE experts in fruit trees and bushes. They developed the Delicious Apples, fruit trees with many more nodes than normal (giving heavy yeilds), and a revolutionary potting method for trees that spurs roots to grow extra vigorously once the tree is planted. It is such an old company that it can quite rightly claim to have been the chief backer of Luther Burbank (and the inheritor of his work and methods).

As an old hand gardener (with over 40 years devoted to the craft) I pick up on things in catalogs that a newby might miss. For instance, A seed catalog might boast of a pepper that grows to be over 4 inches big. That is probably true. The catalogs do not usually lie. But what the catalog did not say was that the pepper has thick walls. I, for one, prefer that there be some pepper in my pepper, not just a thin will with skin on it. When a catalog describes a variety as 'vigorous' that is fine, but what I want to read is the word PRODUCTIVE in the description. And there are mysteries in catalogs. One mystery I, and old gardening partner Mark McAtee, have been pursuing is the Tomato: Black Krim. Most catalogs list this variety (an heirloom from Russia) as being an 80 day plant (infering that in 80 days after set out you start getting fruit). But a few list this variety as 69 days. That is a big difference. After much consideration, I have recently concluded that both numbers are correct...and that is based upon the conclusion that there are two sub-varieties of Black Krim and that the catalogs are selling the variety they have in their possession.

I have developed my one third rule for gardening in Wyoming (and this could apply to some degree to Minnesota). Basically, you will get 1/3 less from a garden in Wyoming than you will get from one in Iowa, perhaps even less. The fruit that you get will be 1/3 smaller, or the volume of production will be 1/3 less.

When I apply the 1/3 rule to climate I get results that are sobering. I calculate that here in Casper our growing season is 114 days. But those 114 days are not comperable to the same number of growing days in Iowa. Many of our nights dip well below 50 degrees farenheit. To get an equivalent I multiply 114 by 2 and get 228. Then I divide by three and I get 76. Thus, in Casper we have a growing season of 76 Iowa-days. That has serious implications when you are selecting varieties to plant in you garden. You will want to plant very short-season varieties.

Below are links to my vegetable variety pages. There are many tables. In the first column of these tables are four-letter links followed by numbers. The four letters are shorthand links to the sites of seed suppliers and the numbers are the days-to-maturity that each seed provider estimates for that variety. Thus, 'Burp65' is a link to the Burpee seed site and 65 would be the days-to-maturity that Burpee estimates for the particular variety in question. Use these links. I have done a lot of leg work for you.

Beans - Carrot

Cauliflower - Corn

Cucumber - Peas

Peppers - Squash

Tomato - Watermelon

Here is a list of my Productivity Ratings for Tomatoes from the 2018 Season. Those varieties marked with an asterick (*) are old favorites of mine.

Inderterminate Tomatoes:

1. Sun Sugar* - 2 plants, productivity rating of 5
2. Buffalo Steak - 2 plants, productivity rating of 3.5
5. Big Mama - 1 plant, productivity rating of 3
6. Atlas Hybrid - 2 plants, productivity rating of 3
7. Goliath Prime - 2 plants, productivity rating of 3
8. Black Krim* - 3 plants, productivity rating of 2.66
9. Tomande* - 3 plants, productivity rating of 2.66

Derterminate Tomatoes:

3. Bush Beefsteak - 3 plants, productivity rating of 3.33
4. Applause* - 8 plants, productivity rating of 3.13
10. BHN 871 (Yellow) - 2 plants, productivity rating of 3

Here too are other favorites from our garden:

Peas: Super Sugar Snap and Sugar Pod
Zucchini Squash: Any yellow variety over any green
Winter Squash/Pumpkin: Red October, Vegetable Spaghetti, Table Ace Acorn, Heart of Gold, Rouge Vif D'Etampes (Cinderella)
Cucumber: GherKing (pickling) and Sugar Crunch (from Burpee)
Pepper: Poblano, King Arthur, and Carmen.
Carrot: Danvers - our favorite - and the best cooking carrot you can grow.
Broccoli: Packman
Onion: Walla Walla (plants 50-75 per bundle
Cabbage: Alcosa (small cabbage from Johnnys's)
Lettuce: We like an Iceberg planted as a leaf lettuce
Beans: Contender (very productive), Roma II

2019 Moon Phases

Mar 7
Mar 14
Mar 21
Mar 28
Apr 6
Apr 12
Apr 19
Apr 26
May 6
May 12
May 19
May 26
Jun 4
Jun 10
Jun 17
Jun 25
Jul 3
Jul 9
Jul 16
Jul 25
Aug 2
Aug 7
Aug 15
Aug 23
Sep 1
Sep 6
Sep 14
Sep 22

2017 Planting Guide

Click Here For 2009 Tomato Taste Test

= Rated for Taste
= Rated for Production

Plant Height New Variety Area
2019
Area
2018
Germination
Farenheit
Set out/Sow
72" to 96" Winter Squash - Red October Area
3 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
59 to 86 Sow May 25
72" to 96" Winter Squash - Cream Of The Crop Acorn Area
0 sq ft
Area
0 sq ft
59 to 86 Sow May 25
72" to 96" Winter Squash - Spaghetti Area
3 sq ft
Area
0 sq ft
59 to 86 Sow May 25
72" to 96" Winter Squash - Heart of Gold Area
3 sq ft
Area
0 sq ft
59 to 86 Sow May 25
72" to 96" Winter Squash - Rouge Vif D'Entempes Area
3 sq ft
Area
0 sq ft
59 to 86 Sow May 25
72" to 96" Total Counts for Winter Squash Area
12 sq ft
Area
18 sq ft
59 to 86 Sow May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Black Krim** Area
2 plants
Area
3 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Tomande** Area
3 plants
Area
3 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Ball's Beefsteak* Area
0 plants
Area
2 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Big Mama** Area
2 plants
Area
1 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Sun Sugar** Area
2 plants
Area
2 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Atlas Hybrid Area
2 plants
Area
2 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Goliath Prime Beef Area
2 plants
Area
2 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Ind. Tomato - Buffalosteak Area
3 plants
Area
2 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
60" Total Counts for Ind. Tomato Area
16 plants
Area
18 plants
59 to 86 Sow May 25
24" Det. Tomato - Applause** Area
4 Plants
Area
8 Plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Det. Tomato - Better Bush Hyb.* Area
0 Plants
Area
3 Plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Det. Tomato - Bush (Beef)Steak Hyb.* Area
4 Plants
Area
3 Plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Det. Tomato - BHN 871 (orange) Area
0 Plants
Area
2 Plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Det. Tomato - Goliath Bush Hyb. Area
0 Plants
Area
2 Plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
18" NEW! Det. Tomato - Tonopah Area
2 plants
Area
0 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
18" NEW! Det. Tomato - Goliath Giant Early Bush Area
2 plants
Area
0 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
18" Total Counts for Det. Tomatoes Area
12 plants
Area
18 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
18" Total Counts for ALL TOMATOES Area
28 plants
Area
36 plants
59 to 86 Set out May 25
28" Peas - Super Sugar Snap Area
13.5 sq ft
Area
13.5 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 1
28" Peas - Sugar Pod Area
13.5 sq ft
Area
13.5 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 1
28" Total Counts for Peas Area
27 sq ft
Area
27 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 1
28" Zucchini - Yellow Area
6 sq ft
Area
6 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 25
28" Zucchini - Green Area
3 sq ft
Area
3 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 25
28" Total Counts for Zucchini Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 25
28" Sugar Crunch Cucumber Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
39 to 62 Sow May 25
26" NEW! GherKing Cucumber Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
63 to 86 Sow May 25
26" Total Counts for Cucumber Area
18 sq ft
Area
18 sq ft
63 to 86 Sow May 25
24" Herbs Area
18 sq ft
Area
18 sq ft
???? May 25
24" Sweet Pepper - Sweet Area
14 sq ft
Area
14 sq ft
68 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Sweet Pepper - Hot Area
6 sq ft
Area
6 sq ft
68 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Total Counts for Peppers Area
20 sq ft
Area
20 sq ft
68 to 86 Set out May 25
24" Chard **** Area
0 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
68 to 86 Sow May 18
24" Carrot - Danver Area
4.5 sq ft
Area
4.5 sq ft
68 to 86 Sow May 18
24" Carrot - Sweetness
(or other Nantes type)
Area
4.5 sq ft
Area
4.5 sq ft
68 to 86 Sow May 18
24" Total Counts for Carrots Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
68 to 86 Sow May 18
18" Broccoli - Packman Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
48 to 77 Set out May 18
17" Beets - Detroit **** Area
0 sq ft
Area
4 sq ft
41 to 86 Sow May 18
12" Onion **** Area
0 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
46 to 77 Sets on May 1
Plants on May11
9" Cabbage Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
57 to 89 Set out May 18
9" Radish Area
6 sq ft
Area
6 sq ft
51 to 84 Sow May 11
6" to 12" Lettuce Area
6 sq ft
Area
6 sq ft
42 to 68 Sow May 1
6" to 12" Bush Bean - Contender Area
18 sq ft ***
Area
18 sq ft
50 to 77 Sow May 18 or 25
6" to 12" Bush Bean - Roma II Area
9 sq ft
Area
9 sq ft
50 to 77 Sow May 18 or 25
6" to 12" Totals for Bush Beans Area
27 sq ft ***
Area
27 sq ft
50 to 77 Sow May 18 or 25

* Grown in 2017 Season, will grow again in 2018

** Grown many times in the past, Wonderful Tomatoes and Productive

*** Will be grown in the 3 sisters bed (corn, beans, squash)
Not now included in totals of plants or square footage.

Click here to email Fred Jacquot