Wild Men on the North Fork

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Fruit Trees and other Fruit for Wyoming

We here in Wyoming live in what can be a marginal climate for fruit, particularly that which grows on a tree or bush. I am convinced that we will never see fruit production like others see it in different parts of the U.S. Most of us in Wyoming live in Zone 4. This gives us a much shorter growing season than other parts of the country. In addition, we often see warm springs that bring out profuse blooms on fruit trees, and then see a sudden cold snap that keeps insects in their burrows, dens, and hives; wonderful shows of blooms with no insects to polinate.

So what you want is a tree that blooms mid-to-late and produces fruit early-to-mid. Try to get a tree that will ripen its fruit before the end of September.

Fruit trees can get to be large. The black (or wild) cherry trees that grow back East can get to be 60 feet tall. When I was very young, my mother's boss had a cherry tree in her back yard in Casper that was 30 feet tall. So, standard-sized fruit trees get big, and that may not be what you want in your yard. I would suggest getting a semi-dwarf (16 feet) or a dwarf tree (9 feet).

When you dig a hole to plant a tree in Wyoming you are most likely to find heavy clay or sand. Fruit trees need rich soil. At planting they need decayed plant material and animal manure. But you should put in the mix about 20 percent clay because nothing beats clay for storing water. If your tree is grafted (virtually all apple trees are grafted) be sure to place the graft just above the soil line when the tree is planted. In the first season go ahead and fertilize to promote growth. After that, fertilize ONLY in early Spring. Fertilizer tells the tree to grow its upper parts, which is alright in the Spring. But later in season we want the tree to put on flowers, to grow fruit, and to grow its roots.

Apple Trees for Wyoming
Honeycrisp
Zones 3-8

Outstanding flavor, early, very winter hardy, ripens early September

Stark Brothers

Gurney's Seeds and Plants

Park Seeds and Plants

Seeds of Change

Jung Seeds and Plants

Cox's Pippin - Heirloom
Zones 4-8

Dessert apple, perhaps the best flavored of all apples, ripens mid-to-late September

Stark Brothers

Seeds of Change

Sweet Sixteen
Zones 3-7

Sweet, crisp, aromatic, very winter hardy - down to 50 degrees below, ripens late September

Stark Brothers

Gurney's Seeds and Plants

Jung Seeds and Plants

State Fair
Zones 3-6

Tart, good general use, winter hardy, parent of Zestar Apple, ripens in September

Salt Spring Apple Co.

The Apple Tree Guy

Zestar!
Zones 4-7

Ripens early, holds its quality, ripens late August to early September

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Wealthy
Zones 4-8

Very hardy, large fruit, ripens in September, good fresh, in pies and sauce

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Red McIntosh - Heirloom
Zones 3-7

Very hardy, medium fruit, distinct tart flavor, aromatic, ripens in September, good keeper

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Gurney's Seeds and Plants

Red Gravenstein - Heirloom
Zones 2-7

Vigorous and productive, medium fruit, sweet-tart flavor, ripens in September,

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Honeygold
Zones 4-7

Dessert apple, cross between Haralson and Golden Delicious, ripens in September, very hardy

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Farmer Seed and Nursery

Whitney Crabapple - Heirloom
Zones 3-7

Largest fruit of all Crabapples, crisp and tangy-sweet, good in pies, sauces, canned, and jellies, ripens in late August or early September

Stark Brothers

Henry Fields Seed and Nursery

Jung Seeds and Plants

Yellow Transparent - Heirloom
Zones 3-7

Earliest of all apples, good for sause and pies. Ripens July or August.

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Northwestern Greening
Zones 3-8

Green apple, great for pies. Ripens late September.

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Cherry Trees for Wyoming


Sorry, but sweet cherry trees will probably not do well in Wyoming unless you live at around 3,000 feet elevation. So, the rest of us will have to content ourselves with 'pie' or 'tart' cherries.

Montmorency Pie Cherry - Heirloom
Zones 3-7

The most dependable of all Pie Cherries for Wyoming. Ripens in July.

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Gurney's Seeds and Plants

Henry Fields Seed and Nursery

Jung Seeds and Plants

North Star Pie Cherry
Zones 3-7

Can produce heavily, ripens in July.

Stark Brothers

Jung Seeds and Plants

Park Seed and Nursery

Gurney's Seeds and Plants

Henry Fields Seed and Nursery

Cherry Gooseberry for Wyoming


Usually grown as a bush

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