Wild Men on the North Fork

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Vegetable Variety Pages: | Beans - Carrot | Cauliflower - Corn |Cucumber - Peas
Peppers - Squash | Tomato - Watermelon
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Varieties and Sources: Why mail order Seeds:

Below are tables for each vegetable in which I am interested. My gardening partner, Mark McAtee, and I have been testing seed varieties for some 30 years now and what appears below, and on the other four varieties pages, are the results of those years of trials.

Note that under the 'Days to Maturity' column in each table there are four-letter words followed by a number. The four-letter words refer to the company catalog in which the variety appears, and the number represents days to maturity given by that company. Each of the four-letter words is a link to each company's web site. You will notice some honest disagreements between seed catalogs about the days to maturity for many varieties. Some of that disagreement may be due to having slightly different strains to offer us, or it could be due to the fact that some have trial beds only close to their headquarters in the South.

Seed Potency: When possible, seed potency is given for each variety. This term refers to the ability of the seed to: germinate, produce numerous offspring, and produce large offspring. Low Potency seeds should not be used the next year, medium potency seeds can be used for two seasons in a row. High potency seeds can be used for three or more seasons.

Part 1: Beans to Carrot

Bush Bean

Bush beans grow well here in Wyoming. Beans and potatoes are about the only vegetables grown commercially here. Pick a variety that is short seasoned, and watch to keep the insects from devouring the shoots. Like all beans, these love to be deeply and well watered. They don't mind alkaline soils, but prefer soils with some humus in them. All beans, except the Garbanzo, Lentil, Soy, and Azuki were first grown by Native Americans. Keep beans picked to keep production coming. Hint: Do not plant more than two kinds of beans together in one bed. Two's company, three's a crowd. Beans don't like nitrogen in their soil. Soil temperatures should not be hot (like in late July). Hint: Deer love beans and peas.

Links: University of Illinois Extension, Garden Guides, Farm-Garden.com, Cooking With Beans,

Soil: Prefers very light fertilizer. Likes some humus in the soil to keep it broken up, but otherwise, it prefers crummy old clay or sand. Beans put nitrogen into the soil, and so don't like nitrogen rich soil.

Companions: Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Potato, Pumpkin, Radish, Squash, Sunflower, other beans, peas

Germination: 97 percent when soils are 59 degrees. Beans don't seem to like really hot soil for germination. In 2007 we planted on May 1.

Group: Legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) Companions are Other Legumes: Pole Beans, Peas

Planting: Due to rot, do not presoak. If your soil is bug-free, then direct seed up to three weeks before the last average day of frost.



Bush Beans


Days to

Maturity

Bush Bean Name - Description Plant Height/Length Product
Recommend:
Bakr 50, Jung 40-50, Reim 55, SeedsN 55, Recommend
Contender or Early Contender -
Produces a week before other beans, great quality, grown from 2000 to 2012, and will grow again in 2013. MediumSeed Potency
? 6 to 8 inches
Bakr 55, Jung 55, Pine 54, Reim 58, SeedsN 56, Recommend
Roma II -
wide, flat pod, Italian bean, smoother more buttery taste, extremely high yeilds even into September. Probably the best bush bean for Wyoming. Grown 2001-2012. Will grow in '13. Medium Seed Potency
18 inches 4 1/2 to 6 inches
Bakr 56, John 55, Jung 55, Pine 51, Reim 51, SeedsN 51, Recommend
Royal Purple Burgandy -
likes colder soil, very good flavor, disease and insect resistant, can often be planted a couple of weeks before the last average frost. Grown in 2003 and not grown since because we have been exploring wax beans. Medium Seed Potency
15 inches 3 to 6 inches
John 52, Jung 53, Park 59, Reim 53, Seed 55-60, Stok 50-53, Rocdor, , Grown in 2009-12 and it produced well in very cold seasons. Will grow again in '13. From the Jung Seed Catalog: "Rich and buttery gourmet flavor. Slim 6 inch glossy yellow pods are crisp, tender and stringless. ... Vigorous and highly productive desease resistant plants bearly early and tolerate cool, wet conditions."MediumSeed Potency 15 to 18 inches 5 to 6 inches
Farm 52, Feld 51, Jung 50, Reim 52, Vrmt 52, Top Crop, [AAS Winner] reliable, hearty with prolific yeilds. We have had some germination problems. Not grown since 2006. Medium Seed Potency 15 to 18 inches 6 to 7 inches
Considering:
Pine 45, Reim 50, SeedsN 51, Strike, From the Pinetree Catalog: "Strike is a heavy yielding 5” bean with great flavor. While it is very popular with commercial growers it is also ideal for home gardeners because of its earliness, its productivity, its flavor, and the fact that plants yield over a remarkably long period of time. Stringless. Disease resistance-Common Bean Mosiac Virus MediumSeed Potency 15 to 18 inches 5 to 6 inches
Varieties We Rate as So-So: Improved Golden Wax
Varieties We Rate as Failures: Espada, Fava or Broad Windsor, Derby, Jade, Heavyweight II
Have Grown in the Past:
Vrmt 55, Incredible, new, and a winner in our 2001 bean trials, beans are usually round and straight, big yeilds, worthy of its name! Not available from 2003 onward. 18 inches 5 to 6 inches


Pole Beans


Pole beans, like bush beans, will grow here in Wyoming. The challenge is to pick a variety that is short seasoned, and then to keep the insects from devouring the shoots and the deer from devouring the leaves once the runners start shooting up. Like all beans, these love to be deeply and well watered. They don't mind alkaline soils, but prefer soils with some humus in them. We do not intend to plant pole beans for 2007, or for several years in the future, because our bush beans have outperformed our poles beans to such an extent that it seems that pole beans are a waste of space. Perhaps we will change our minds in the future.
Days to

Maturity

Pole Bean Name - Description Plant Height/Length Product
Might someday consider:
Farm 60, Jung 60, Stringless Blue Lakes S-7- AAS Winner (2003) - beans borne on spurs sticking out from main vine. Very productive, Vigorous Vines, Grown in 2004 and 2005. Grew in 2006. Terrible production. 7 feet 6 to 6 1/2 inches
Burp 60, Pine 64, Seed 65, Vrmt 70, Romano - Very heavy yeilds of long, stringless pods ? ?
John 60, Vrmt 60, Fortex - round 'filet' type green bean, Johnnys calls this the best eating bean. ? 7 to 11 inches
Park 58, Vrmt 58, Helda - romano type, light green, great flavor, production may double other beans, immense yeilds. Grown in 2003, 2004, and 2005 terrible years for beans. Not grown in 2007. 6 to 8 feet 9 inches
Stok 53, Vrmt 60, Emerite - True french filet bean on a pole 8 feet 8 inches
Gurn 67, Purple Pod - excellent flavor 6 feet 6 to 7 inches
John 62, Pine 64, Purple Trionfo Violetto - Heavy yeilds of purple beans ? 8 inches
John 56, Northeaster - Rich, sweet flavor. Vigorous growth. ? 8 inches
Seed 65, Black Seeded Blue Lake - Far more productive than any bush bean. This pole bean has a dedicated following. ? 6 1/2 inches
Seed 63, Cascade Giant - straight dark green pods motled with purple ? 8 to 10 inches
Varieties We Rate as Failures: Kwintus, Marvel of Venice, Ura, Musica
Have Grown in the Past:
Pine 67, Garafal Oro - Romano-type, exceptionally high yeilds

We grew this in 2002. Wilt resistant. Not offered for 2003.

10 to 20 feet 8 to 12 inches

Beet

Beets seem to have been cultivated first around the Mediterranean. They do grow well here in Wyoming, and the state has an active Sugar Beet industry. Beets are hard to germinate. Soaking helps this some. It is better to seed heavily and thin later than to have few plants with which to work.

Beet seeds seem to like very firm soil when they are planted. While I do not recommend that you jump up and down on your rows, you should press the seeds in firmly with your palm.

Links: University of Illinois Extension, Texas A&M,

Soil: Prefers lots of humus and lots of droppings, or heavy commercial fertilizer; but will grow in any soil. Soil should be loose, sandy is fine.

Companions: Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Onion

Germination: 100 percent when soils are 41 degrees. This one loves cool soils.

Group: Beets (Beta vulgaris) Other Beets: Chard Harvest when they are 1 1/4 to 2 inches in diameter. Beet tops can be eaten as greens.

Planting: Direct sew only. To get better germination, pack soil around seeds tightly.

Days to

Maturity

Name - Description Product
Recommend:
Bakr 55, Burp 59, Farm 62, Feld 60, Gurn 58, Jung 60, Park 60, Peac 59, Pine 63, Stok 59, Vrmt 60, Recommend
Detroit,
From the Baker Creek catalog: "55 days. The most popular, old standard, all-purpose, red beet, uniform and smooth, blood-red flesh that is sweet and tasty. 14-inch tops make good greens. Heirloom variety introduced in 1892." Red all through, hardy. Medium Seed Potency ...Heirloom***
3 to 4 inches
Considering:
John 50, Park 53, Pine 51, Shum 60, Stok 53, Vrmt 53, Red Ace - A 'Detroit' type of beet, early, red all through, very disease resistant. We grew this in '09 and will grow again in 2010. ?

Broccoli

Broccoli grows very well in Wyoming. I think it likes our alkaline soils. This is one of the most productive things you can plant if you get a variety with good side shoot production. In summer, broccoli will head only after evenings begin to cool (late July, or August). You will not get serious side shoots until after the central heads have been cut. So don't let them stay on much longer after they have reached 7 inches across. You must keep the side shoots picked to keep up production. Broccoli will keep producing after the first hard frost. By August you may see Broccoli ruined by aphids. Pull the whole plant out of the ground and move it away from your garden entirely, so as to keep the aphids from affecting other plants and laying eggs. Aphids attack broccoli from the air. Therefore place aluminum foil around the base of the plant as a mulch. The foil disorients the aphids with light coming up from below.

Links: University of Illinois Extension, Texas A&M, WHFoods, Broccoli News, Compound In Broccoli Could Boost Immune System, Broccoli Sprout-derived Extract Protects Against Ultraviolet Radiation, Broccoli chemical's cancer check,

Soils: Prefers lots of humus and lots of droppings, or heavy commercial fertilizer. Soil should be firm, not loose.

Companions: Beets, Brussel Sprouts, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Carrot, Dill, Onion

Germination: 93 percent when soils are 59 degrees.

Group: Brassica (Brassica oleracea [italica group]) Other Brassica: Brussel Sprout, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens Watch Broccoli closely for bugs, particularly slugs and aphids. These bugs can be killed effectively with numerous chemicals. Cut when buds are compact but before they turn yellow or open into flowers.

Planting: Start indoors, set plants out.

Days to

Maturity

Name - Description Plant Height/Length Product
Recommend:
Farm 60, Park 57, Pine 52, Reim 50, Ttom 55, Vrmt 50, Recommend
Packman,
offered by many greenhouses, 8 inch central head, very heavy side shoot production rest of summer, superb! Grown in 2000-2012. Will grow in '13. We think this is the best broccoli you can plant. High Seed Potency
20 inches ?
Considering:
Pine 43, Sun King Hybrid - From the Burpee catalog: "The choicest, tastiest broccoli you will find. Large, blue-green variety, with heads 6-8" in diameter, is a standout for its great leaf cover, abundant side shoots and unrivalled heat-tolerance. Excellent garden variety for hot, southern climes. Harvest the nutrition-loaded, health-giving beauties from spring until fall." ? ?

Brussel Sprouts

Brussel Sprouts can be grown in Wyoming. I grew it for the first time in 2001. 2002 Update: There is a propper way to grow Brussel Sprouts (We have been doing it the wrong way.). Leaves should be left on the plant until sprouts bud at the base of the plant. Then leaves should be removed from the bottom of the plant to the top as the buds arrive. Pinch out the growing point at the top of the stem to speed development of all the buds. Do this about September 1 - 15. Brussel Sprouts should only be picked after the first heavy frost.

By August you may see Brussel Sprouts ruined by aphids. Pull the whole plant out of the ground and move it away from your garden entirely, so as to keep the aphids from affecting other plants and laying eggs. Aphids attack brussel sprouts from the air. Therefore place aluminum foil around the base of the plant as a mulch. The foil disorients the aphids with light coming up from below.

Soil: Prefers lots of humus and lots of droppings, or heavy commercial fertilizer. Soil should be firm, not loose.

Companions: Broccoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens, Potatoes,

Germination: 93 percent when soils are 59 degrees.

Group: Brassica (Brassica oleracea [gemmifera group]) Other Brassica: Broccoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens Not grown by us in 2004 or 2005. Sprouts may be picked as soon as they are firm/or about 1 inch in diameter. Pick lower sprouts as they develop. Remove lower leaves to encourage sprout development.

Planting: Start indoors, set plants out.

Days to

Maturity

Name - Description Plant Height/Length
Considering:
Due to past failures, and the fact that Brussel Sprouts seem to be the 'buggiest' plants a person can grow in Wyoming, we are not going to plant Brussel Sprouts any time in the next several years.
Have Grown in the Past:
Pine 75 Masterline - vigorous plant, flavor is best when touched by frost

We grew this in 2001 and 2002. In 2001 it was attacked by aphids and we mishandled it in 2002. We would consider growing this variety again.

36 inches

Cabbage

Cabbage is a brassica. Cabbage was first cultivated around the Mediterranean and in Asia Minor. Many gardeners in Wyoming grow cabbage. It takes up a lot of space to grow. We grew Savoy Cabbage for the first time in 2002. Cabbage days to maturity are usually given from day of transplanting.

Links: University of Illinois Extension, Texas A&M, WHFoods, Cabbage Recipes,

Soil: Prefers year-old droppings in moderate quantities, or light applications of commercial fertilizer. Humus should be 25 to 50 % of soil. Likes firm soil.

Companions: Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens, Potatoes,

Germination: 93 percent when soils are 59 degrees.

Group: Brassica (Brassica oleracea [capitata group]) Other Brassica: Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens 2004: We observed that cabbage grown in tubes were not affected by bugs. Cut heads when they are solid and before they split. Smaller heads or sprouts may develop from the cut stems. These will be 2 to 4 inches across and firm when harvested.

Planting: Start indoors, set plants out.

Days to

Maturity

Name - Description Plant Height/Length
Recomend:
Jung 55, Pine 70, Stok 75, Vrmt 55 Recommend
Savoy Express - [AAS Winner]
wrinkled 'savoyed' leaves, 8 X 6 inch heads, can crowd 12 inches apart

Grew this in 2002-07. Grown in '08. Compact so you can give them tight spacing. Great flavor. We will experiment with other small cabbages in '09.High Seed Potency

1 pound
Considering:
John 66, Park 55, Pine 55, Gonzales Baby Cabbage - weighs in at one pound, and is ready to harvest at 6 inches, can be planted 8 to 12 inches apart. Grown in 2012. Will grow again in 2013. High Seed Potency 1 pound
John 65, Asia Express Baby Cabbage - From the Johnny's Catalog: "The beautiful, smooth, uniformly round heads avg. 4-6" in diameter, depending on spacing. The tender, slightly sweet and peppery leaves have excellent eating quality even in warm weather. Better eating quality than Gonzales, which it replaces." High Seed Potency 1 pound
John 68, Park 68, Caraflex Baby Cabbage - small uniform heads are pointed, with good wrapper leaves for insect and sun protection. Grown in 2012. Will grow again in 2013. High Seed Potency 1 pound
John 68, Pine 72, Vrmt 62, Alcosa - Savoy. From the Johnny's catalog: "Early producer of round, 2-4 lb., deep blue-green, crinkled heads. Alcosa's well-packed, thin, yellow interior leaves quickly fill in, making it a smart choice for closely spaced plantings of mini cabbages. Flavor improves with cold weather. Best in cooked dishes." High Seed Potency 2-4 pounds
John 68, Red Express - From the Johnny's catalog: "Compact plants and solid, round, 2-4 lb. heads with good appearance and flavor. Relatively split resistant. Recommended for Northern areas." High Seed Potency 2-4 pounds
Bakr ?, Cour di Bue - From the Baker Creek catalog: "Tender 3 to 4 lb., pointed oxheart-type heads, very good for home use or specialty markets. We offer quality Italian seed for this old European heirloom. This type of cabbage was very popular 150 years ago. Fairly early and of superb quality. High Seed Potency 3-4 pounds
Bakr ?, Henderson's Charleston Wakefield - From the Baker Creek catalog: "Larger than Early Jersey Wakefield, (4-6 lbs) and only a little later, this fine variety was developed by Peter Henderson & Co. in 1892. It is a good variety for the South." Pointed Cabbage. High Seed Potency 4-6 pounds
Pine 48, Point One - From the Pine Tree catalog: "A pointed head cabbage. We were very impressed with the earliness and holing capacity of this unique variety. Point One is bred for resistance to a number of diseases. Plants are a yellowish green and very attractive." High Seed Potency 4-6 pounds
Have Grown in the Past: Arrowhead - Must be picked early, otherwise, it will split.

Chinese Cabbage

Chinese Cabbage, of course, was developed by the Chinese. It grows well here in Wyoming. We grew bok choi in 2002 with good success. Cabbage days to maturity are usually given from day of transplanting.

Links: Texas A&M, Farm Info,

Soils: Prefers year-old droppings in moderate quantities, or light applications of commercial fertilizer. Humus should be 25 to 50 % of soil. Likes firm soil.

Companions: Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts Cauliflower, Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens, Potatoes,

Germination: 93 percent when soils are 59 degrees.

Group: Brassica (Brassica rapa [pekinensis group]) Other Brassica: Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Kale, Mustard Greens Cut the entire plant at the gournd line when harvesting. Heads should be compact and firm.

Planting: Start indoors, set plants out.

Days to

Maturity

Name - Description Product
Recomend:
John 48, Recommend
Minuet
- Napa type, forms 9 x 7 inch heads, slow to bolt. Grown in 2008-10. Very good performer. We will grow this one again.
?
Considering:
John 45, Baby Bak Choi - 'Choi', a minature form. ?
John 45, Nich 45, Stok 45, Mei Qing Choi - 'Choi' type, more tender and better flavor than Joi Choi. Grown in 2003, will grow again. ?
Burp 55, Gurn 45, John 50, Jung 45, Nich 45, Park 45, Terr 45, Vrmt 45, Pak Choi Joi Choi - harvest all or by the stalk. We grew this in 2002. Beautiful plants, held up well to June cold spell. We would consider growing this again. 9 inches
Terr 65, Tenderheart, Napa-Type, loads of flavor in a dense head. Medium Seed Potency 2 lbs.
Varieties We Rate as Failures: Greenwhich, Bonzai

Carrot

Carrots are often hard to get germinated. They can take up to three weeks to germinate. They like warm, wet soil to germinate, but seem to like cool weather after that. Wyoming seems to give these conditions in reverse order. Some folks cover the soil to keep it moist while seeds are germinating. You may want to have extra seed on hand if replanting becomes necessary. I have found that the shortest season varieties do best here. Carrots supposedly appeared first in Central Asia. But they probably grew wild all across Europe and Asia, and different people ate them throughout history. They were first grown as a modern crop in France in the early 1800's. That is why the older varieties have French names. Carrots are very frost resistant in the fall, and seem to increase in sugar content after the first hard frost.

Links: University of Illinois Extension, Texas A&M, Carrot Museum,

Soil: Prefers loose soil, with lots of humus. Sandy is fine. Do not add fertilizer. Does very well in raised beds.

Companions: Lettuce, Onion *, Parsely, Peas, Radish, Tomato

Germination: 93 percent when soils are 50 degrees.

Group: Carrot (Daucus carota var. sativus) Other Carrot: Parsely 2003- We finally have found the great Wyoming carrot. Tendersweet is the one. Young carrots are more tender, mature carrots are sweeter.

Planting: Sew directly

Park 62, Pine 72, Seed 70, Shum 65, Vrmt 68,
Days to

Maturity

Name - Description Product
Recomend:
Farm 70, Feld 63, Gurn 75, Pine 70, Reim 75, SeedsN 72, Recommend
Tendersweet - Imperator
, sweetest and longest carrot, catalogs say this is the sweetest carrot you can grow. We finally have found the great Wyoming carrot. This is the one. Grown 2003-08. Did not grow in 2012. Do wait to pull up until after several hard frosts. High Seed Potency
9 to 10 inches
Bakr 70, Burp 75, Pine 75, Reim 75, SeedsN 72, Recommend
Danvers
, developed in America in the 1800's, best carrot for cooking, in fact, its flavor seems to be enhanced by cooking. Probably the best cooking carrot there is. Grown 2000-2012. Will grow in '13. Do wait to pull up until after several hard frosts. High Seed Potency ...Heirloom***
6 to 8 inches
Farm 62, Jung 62, Vrmt 72, Recommend
Sweetness III
, Nantes-type, sweet, strong plant once germinated, good cooking carrot.

Grown in 2001-2012. Will grow in '13.. Very Sweet and excellent cooked, and is even better raw. Do wait to pull up until after several hard frosts. High Seed Potency

6 to 8 inches
Considering:
Gurn 90, John 73, Park 70, Ttom 70, Purple Haze - From the Park catalog: "70 days. What will they think of next?? Here is the first-ever hybrid purple Carrot -- a return to the distant past when wild carrots were naturally purple. Very vigorous and easy to grow, this delicious vegetable will be the centerpiece of your garden and the talk of the neighborhood!

Purple Haze is a Nantes-type carrot, with strong growth and a delectable sweet flavor. Its rich purple color extends only as far as the core, which remains bright orange. And it tastes just like ordinary orange carrots . . . but you don't have to tell the kids that!

Purple Haze has been awarded a 2006 All-America Selection for its remarkable return to the original color of wild carrots, and I'm delighted to be able to offer it here in Park. To take advantage of its bright purple color, serve it raw, for cooking will dull it (though the flavor will still be splendid!). And if you're looking for more "wild" colored Carrots, take a look at amazing new Rainbow! Pkt. is 1/32 oz. at least 400 seeds."

8 inches
Bakr 75, John 70, Jung 76, Park 75, Peac 70, Pine 76, Vrmt 76, Atomic Red - From the Baker Creek catalog: "Brilliant red carrots are so healthful and unique-looking, sure to add color to your garden. The 8" roots are high in lycopene, which has been shown in studies to help prevent several types of cancer. Crisp roots are at their best when cooked, and this helps to make the lycopene more usable." Grown in 2013. Would grow again. 8 inches
Bakr 70, St. Valery - From the Baker Creek catalog: "The Vilmorins of France mentioned this variety in 1885 and said it had been grown a 'long time' then. A large handsome variety with bright red-orange roots; smooth, 10"-12" long and 2"-3" in diameter. Sweet and tender. Rare. Our favorite!" 10 to 12 inches
Jung 65, Baltimore - From the Jung catalog: "Grow giant carrots with great flavor and quality. Harvest Baltimore as normal sized, 8 to 9 inch, Nantes-type carrots or let them grow to 12 to 14 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. The vitamin A rich, deep orange roots stay mild and sweet with a juicy crunch. Ideal for soups, stews, roasting and juicing." 8 to 9 inches
Cook ?, John 56, Jung 62, Park 60, Seed 50-55, Yaya - From the Seeds of Change catalog: "Early 6" bright orange carrot with a cylindrical shape and blunt tip. Widely held to be one of the best tasting of all the Nantes cultivars for all seasons. Great bunching for fresh market appeal with strong 12" tops." 6 inches
Have Grown in the Past:
John 54, Park 60, Pine 70, Terr 56, Vrmt 54, Mokum - high sugar and beta carotene

Grown in 2002. Very sweet, good cooked, and the best producer we had in 2002. EEECCPPP

6 inches
Burp 70, Feld 68, Gurn 65, Jung 70, Nich ?, Nantes, Scarlet, sweet, strong plant once germinated, would grow again . EECP ...Heirloom*** 6 to 7 inches
Jung 72, Nich 70, Park 75, Pine 75, Seed 80, Shum 68, Stok 60, Royal Chantenay, universal carrot, get in early as this pushes the days-to-maturity envelope, also known as red-cored, would grow again. ECP ...Heirloom*** 6 inches
Varieties We Rate as Failures: Rainbow, Yellowstone, Kuroda, Envy
Ratings: E=Eating(Sweetness) C=Cooking Quality P=Production

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